DNA Repair and Mutagenesis Seminars

Environmental agents that can induce DNA damage and mutations are the focus of research in multiple labs within the Center for Environmental Health Sciences, and fostering conversations among experts in this area is part of the Center's mission.  For many years, the DNA Repair And Mutagenesis (DRAM) seminars have brought together scientists from institutions throughout New England who share an interest in the mechanisms of genome maintenance, and the consequences of mutations in humans and model organisms.  The DRAM seminars are held monthly during the academic fall and spring terms and comprise of two talks, for 20 minutes each, by either graduate students, post docs, or principal investigators.  Ample time is reserved for questions both during and after the seminars to promote friendly and engaging discussions.  We hope you will join us for this unique opportunity to meet and network with other scientists.  Refreshments are available before the talks.

Contact 
Nimrat Chatterjee (nimrat@mit.edu), Walker Lab, MIT
Charley Gruber (cgruber@mit.edu), Walker Lab, MIT

Location

MIT Building 56 Room 614

  • Refreshments - 6:45pm
  • Talks - 7:00pm - 8:00pm
  • Networking - 8:00pm - 9:00pm

Dram Seminar Events

March 8, 2018 | 6:45-9:00p | 56-614

DRAM Seminar 3/8/2018

Vignesh MP Babu; Walker Lab, MIT. Novel pathways in processing stalled transcription complexes in Escherichia coli

Charley Gruber; Walker Lab, MIT. Incomplete base excision repair and bacterial cell death

April 12, 2018 | 6:45-9:00p | 56-614

DRAM Seminar 4/12/2018

Faye-Marie Vassel; Walker Lab, MIT. Role of multi-functional REV7 in modulating chemotherapeutic response in drug resistant lung tumors

Bert van de Kooij; Yaffe Lab, MIT. New insights into Double-Strand Break repair using a novel reporter

May 10, 2018 | 6:45-9:00p | 56-614

DRAM Seminar 5/10/2018

Prabha Sarangi; D’Andrea Lab, Harvard Medical School. Regulation of the Multifunctional Rev7 Protein

Nimrat Chatterjee; Walker Lab, MIT. Small molecule REV1 adjuvant enhances tumor cell response to chemotherapy by disrupting mutagenic translesion synthesis